Excess Estrogen – Taming the Dominatrix Through Nutrition

The past couple of weeks we’ve talked about what estrogen is and what it does as well as what happens when it gets out of control.  Today we’ll discuss what you can do nutritionally to lower your bad estrogen levels.
First of all, let’s talk about what we need more of … fibre.  We all need it and yet most of us don’t consume enough fibre to keep our digestive tract functioning optimally and our estrogen levels under control.  The ideal amount of fibre is 35 to 45 grams per day, although most women only consume between 13-18 grams.  Even eating 7 or so servings of fresh fruit and vegetables per day, most women don’t get enough.  Prunes are a terrific source of fibre, and consumption of prunes has been shown to reduce estrone … the not so good form of estrogen.  Raspberries, cauliflower, collard greens, broccoli, swiss chard and spinach are excellent sources of fibre.
Increase your fish intake from sustainable sources.  Avoid high mercury fish such as commercial tuna and farmed salmon.  There are some farmed fish that are safe but by and large most farmed fish, especially salmon, come from filthy pools where there is a lot of disease.  My recommendation is to only purchase fish from an actual fishmonger who can tell you where the fish has been sourced from.  You can also check www.seafoodwatch.org to investigate what fish is best.
Add foods containing sulphur to your diet.  These include garlic, onions and whole eggs (sulphur is in the yolks and despite what you may have been told in the past, eggs are actually quite good for you but the nutrition is in the yolks, not so much in the whites).  The best eggs to choose are organic, free range, cage free.  Sulphur compounds allow the liver to remove pesticides more efficiently from the body.
To give your liver another break, eat organic as much as possible, especially the “dirty dozen”.  This list changes every year.  If you’re interested in what the dirty dozen is, give me a shout and I’ll send you some info.
What do we need to reduce or eliminate from our diet to reduce the amount of estrogen in our bodies?  You may not like this, but alcohol and caffeine have both been shown to adversely affect estrogen levels.  Alcohol increases estrogen and can disrupt liver function and increase risk of breast cancer.  Caffeine raises estrogen and cortisol levels.  If you really need a boost in the morning, I recommend my energizing hot chocolate.
Red meat and commercial dairy are big sources of hormones.  I highly recommend that you eat more chicken, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts and seeds as protein sources.  If you love red meat (I know I do), choose meat that is grass fed, hormone free and “free range” instead of factory farmed meat.  Organic milk and goat milk are safe but dairy-free milks are recommended, although soy must absolutely be avoided, especially if you have high estrogen.
Refined sugar and saturated fat (except for coconut) are also on the restricted list.  The reason coconut is not is because coconut is a medium chain triglyceride, which means it is not stored as fat but rather converts to energy in your body.  Does that mean you should eat a ton of coconut oil, butter, etc.?  Of course not.  But it does have a high smoke point for cooking and helps provide energy but a little goes a long way.
So in summary … eat fresh fruits (mostly berries) in moderation and lots of vegetables, lots of water, moderate amounts of best quality meat you can afford and avoid alcohol, caffeine, refined sugar and saturated fats.
If you’d like more information or help with getting this diva under control, please contact me and we’ll get you back on your road to good health.
Sandy O’Shea, CNP
Holistic Nutritionist

Leave a Reply

Recent Posts

FREE DOWNLOAD!!

Top 12 Tips to Spice up your Sex Life.